GSO Test

SEND

Mrs Beere is currently working three days a week as my Assistant SENDCo across both schools.

First and foremost, your child’s class teacher is responsible for ensuring your child’s needs are met and for keeping you up to date in terms of progress. 

All parents are invited to attend parents evenings and at these meetings the class teacher will share with you a provision map outlining any additional support your child may be getting. You are welcome to have a copy, please just ask your teacher. You are of course welcome to discuss your child’s progress at any time in the year. If you would like to see your child’s teacher, please do call the office to arrange a time.

For SEN children, either Mrs Beere or myself will carry out regular observations and meetings with you and with the class teacher. Mrs Beere will be continuing her drop-in sessions in her Assistant SENDCo role, should you wish to speak to her.

The drop in sessions are usual at the end of each month. 

There is an SEND parent support group who meet the last Wednesday morning of the month at the Potters Gate Children’s Centre. It is run by Joanna Elliott and local Farnham parents are welcome to drop in between 9.30 and 11.30am.

Mrs Julie Aldridge our ELSA (Emotional Literacy Support Assistant) works two afternoons a week. She works closely alongside the two ELSA’s from Potters Gate, giving emotional support to any children in school. Caroline Yates also provides some sessions and also does an afternoon of Lego construction, which develops social skills and language.

As well as emotional support, the children access additional learning support through interventions which are being delivered in class with the TAs and out of class with Alix Fry. Mrs Fry is a KS1 intervention TA and sees children who have been identified as needing additional support in areas such as reading, phonics, writing and maths. Mrs Fry is also in class as a TA one afternoon a week.

Should you wish to discuss the progress of your child in these interventions then the drop-in session with Mrs Beere is a valuable opportunity to meet with them both.

If you have questions or would like to meet, then please do not hesitate to contact me.

Alexis Carpenter
Executive SENDCo

Alexis Carpenter – senco@potters-gate.surrey.sch.uk      01252 715619

Claire Beere – assistsenco@potters-gate.surrey.sch.uk    01252 715619

 

Resources

SEND Home Learning

On this page, I will be adding items for those who may want some additional support for their children with Special Educational Needs, for example Speech and Language or motor skills activities. We want to ensure that the children are supported as best as possible during this tricky time.

Each tab (at the bottom of this page) will have different areas identified with different activities to download.

Please feel free to email Alexis Carpenter on senco@potters-gate.surrey.sch.uk if you have any queries.

SEND Support

This is a list of information websites, tips and resources to help you support your children with their additional needs, learning and self-esteem. Children have varying needs and there is no one size approach fits all. It is quite common for children to have additional needs that span all these areas, so select the resources that meet the needs of your child, without worrying too much about the label or category they fall under. Everyone has strengths and weaknesses and these SEND strategies will be beneficial to many children, whether or not they have a diagnosis.

ASD

Information Websites

www.autism.org.uk

www.autism.org.uk/about/family-life/parents-carers

Tips

  • Children with Autism need structure and routine. You can help them by using visual timetables to help them see what is happening at each step of the day, so they know in advance what they will be doing next. This will relieve some of their anxiety. 
  • You might want to set a specific place for them to do any work or tasks. At school they may have this in the form of a workstation to support their learning (see example in resources section). Each child’s workstation may differ slightly, so you could ask your child to help you set one up that will suit them or that they are already used to.
  • Prepare them for changes in routine.
  • Help your children to recognise and name different emotions and feelings. You can do this by discussing their own emotions, how characters in books and on TV programmes might be feeling and how you yourselves might be feeling. Alongside naming the emotion, describe it and explain why you, they or fictional characters might be feeling like that. You can also play role play guessing games and ask them to name the emotion and say why.
  • Use a 5 point scale to support children in managing their emotions.
  • Use social stories and comic strip cartoons to help children understand different situations and perspectives and address inappropriate behaviour.
  • Have a visual aid to support wanted and unwanted behaviours (see School Website for examples).
  • Be aware of your child’s sensory needs and support them in managing that need to help them learn e.g. sound reducing earphones if noise is a problem, comfortable clothes, keep the area surrounding the work space clear to avoid over-stimulation etc.
  • Play lots of games with your child to encourage social skills, such as taking turns and winning and losing.

 

Resources

Visual timetable (see school website)

Social stories and comic strip cartoons: www.autism.org.uk/about/strategies/social-stories-comic-strips

5 point scale: www.5pointscale.com

Social skills games: www.twinkl.co.uk

 

autismteachingstrategies.com/free-social-skills-downloads-2

 

Example of how a workstation works: 

www.google.com/search?q=asd+workstation

ADHD

Information Websites

www.adhdfoundation.org.uk/information/parents

General Info on ADHD - www.adders.org/info170

Self esteem -  www.adders.org/info79

Managing ADHD - www.adders.org/info58

Tips

  • Offer routines and structure
  • Create a quiet space for them to learn with no distractions.
  • Give them something to fiddle with whilst you are talking to them or you want them to focus. It can also be helpful to let them move around whilst they listen.
  • Ask them to do one task at a time
  • Provide checklists or visual timetables to support organisation.
  • Use timers to help with time management and build in frequent movement breaks.
  • Suggest rather than criticise (children with ADHD often have low self-esteem)
  • Provide lots of opportunities for exercise and movement.
  • Set up a reward scheme to encourage them and support them with their behaviour.
  • Build on success and help children to pursue more of what they enjoy.
  • Put clear boundaries in place.

Resources

www.thebodycoach.com/blog/pe-with-joe-1254

Play games on consoles such as just dance, Wii Sports etc. to get your kids moving

Dyslexia

Information Websites

www.bdadyslexia.org.uk/advice/children/how-can-i-support-my-child

 

www.understood.org/en/school-learning/learning-at-home/homework-study-skills/8-working-memory-boosters

Tips

  • It is important to encourage children to recognise and pursue the areas in which they excel (do more of what they enjoy) and support them with the areas they find difficult.
  • Allow children to use a word processer to complete some written tasks. This highlights spelling errors and offers alternatives. If they can’t type, encourage them to learn, so that they are able to use a Word Processer with more speed and fluency.
  • lay games to support memory and retention e.g. pairs, Go Fish etc. (see resource links for more ideas)
  • Enable children to access age related audiobooks to develop a love of reading. Encourage (don’t force or push) them to share what’s happening in the story and share their excitement, wondering aloud what will happen next. This will also develop their vocabulary and comprehension, without them even realising that they are learning.
  • Don’t make reading a fight. Encourage chn to read one page and you read the next page. Read some books to them for pleasure and invite them to read a section if they want to (don’t push if they don’t want to). By developing a love of books and stories children will naturally want to learn how to read, so make the experience as pleasurable as you can.

Resources

Dancemat Typing – free beginners typing course for children. www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zf2f9j6/articles/z3c6tfr

 

Free Phonics games - www.phonicsplay.co.uk

 

www.weareteachers.com/working-memory

 

www.understood.org/en/school-learning/learning-at-home/homework-study-skills/8-working-memory-boosters

 

Free audio stories stories.audible.com/start-listen

Motor Coordination Disorder/Dyspraxia

Information Websites

dyspraxiafoundation.org.uk

www.movementmattersuk.org

Tips

  • Allow children to use a word processer to complete some written tasks. If they can’t type, encourage them to learn, so that they are able to use a Word Processer with more speed and fluency.
  • Offer routines and structure
  • Create a quiet space for them to learn with no distractions.
  • Give them something to fiddle with whilst you are talking to them or you want them to focus. It can also be helpful to let them move around whilst they listen.
  • Ask them to do one task at a time
  • Provide checklists or visual timetables to support organisation.
  • Use timers to help with time management and build in frequent movement breaks.
  • Play lots of games with your child to encourage social skills, such as taking turns and winning and losing.
  • Help your children develop their fine and gross motor skills and core stability (see resource below)

 

dyspraxiafoundation.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/classroomguidelines

 

Resources

Dancemat Typing – free beginners typing course for children. www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zf2f9j6/articles/z3c6tfr

Motor skills development: www.lincolnshirecommunityhealthservices.nhs.uk/application/files/2915/2285/5110/1st_Move

Visual timetable (see school website)

Social stories and comic strip cartoons: www.autism.org.uk/about/strategies/social-stories-comic-strips

5 point scale: www.5pointscale.com

Social skills games: www.twinkl.co.uk/resources/specialeducationalneeds-sen

Dyscalculia

Information Websites

www.sess.ie/categories/specific-learning-disabilities/dyscalculia/tips-learning-and-teaching

www.bdadyslexia.org.uk/dyslexia/neurodiversity-and-co-occurring-differences/dyscalculia-and-maths-difficulties

Tips

  • Concentrate on one problem at a time.
  • Use lots of visuals and physical resources that the children can move around.
  • Include children in supporting you with everyday maths problems e.g. cooking, measuring, money etc.

blog.brainbalancecenters.com/2016/02/5-strategies-for-managing-dyscalculia

www.understood.org

Resources

whiterosemaths.com/homelearning

www.10ticks.co.uk

Speech and Language

Information Websites

www.tamesidehospital.nhs.uk/our-services/community-services/speech-and-therapy

www.thecommunicationtrust.org.uk

Tips

Speech sounds

  • Model speech to the children by repeating words back to them correctly.
  • Understanding:
  • Give children time to process what you have asked and respond.
  • Use simple language and break instructions down into smaller steps.
  • Encourage children to answer questions, such as who, what, where, when and why? When reading their books. Encourage them to tell you the story in their own words.

Expression

  • Talk about all your experiences in detail, teaching new vocabulary all the time.
  • Discuss vocabulary in books, making sure the children understand the meaning of tricky words. 

Social Communication

  • Play lots of games with your child to encourage social skills, such as taking turns and winning and losing.
  • Use a visual timetable and visual aids to provide structure and routines.

Resources

www.thecommunicationtrust.org.uk

Continue to work on Speech and Language targets set by the Speech and Language Therapist (if already seen).

www.thecommunicationtrust.org.uk/resources/resources/resources-for-parents

Social skills games: www.twinkl.co.uk

 

autismteachingstrategies.com/free-social-skills-downloads-2